What Do You Really Remove from Your Mouth When You Floss?


Posted on 5/30/2019 by Thomas Wold, DMD
What Do You Really Remove from Your Mouth When You Floss?There are a whole lot of you out there that hate to floss. We get it. Flossing is a pain, and tooth brushing is so much easier. Flossing takes up a lot of time, and gets in the way of you finishing up your pre-work routine.

However, flossing is vital to your dental health. Without flossing, you are more prone to cavities and infections in your mouth that can cause real damage. Not sure what we mean? Keep reading for more information about why flossing your teeth is so important.

Flossing is Key

When you floss your teeth, you are setting yourself up for removal of all kinds of things in your mouth that get in the way good oral hygiene. That's because flossing gets in between your teeth, and gets out trapped food particles and plaque that lead to cavities. Food particles and plaque lead to cavities because the bacteria in your mouth feed off them. These bacteria create acids that can eat away at your tooth enamel, and cause cavities and gum disease.

Over time, these acids can make holes in your teeth. It doesn't just happen overnight. That's why it's so important to floss every day. Removing these particles every day means that the acids from the food particles and plaque don't have time to create havoc in your mouth.

Flossing is Really Good for Your Oral Health

If you floss your teeth every day, you will notice changes in your mouth. Your breath will stay fresher for longer periods of time. Your overall dental health will get better. You may notice that your gums aren't swollen around your teeth, and they may no longer be tender. You might also notice that your back teeth are cleaner and healthier.

Have questions about your teeth? Do you know how long you need to floss for? Are you sure about your flossing technique? Why not give us a call? We love talking about teeth!